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There Went Number 10 Print Signed by “Boots” Blesse

In stock
SKU
P2129
$150.00

Major "Boots" Blesse was in a tight spot. This mission on October 3rd, 1952 was his 123rd, two away from the end of his tour. With 9 victories to his credit, he was the leading ace in Korea.

Notes

please allow up to 10 business days for framing

Major "Boots" Blesse was in a tight spot. This mission on October 3rd, 1952 was his 123rd, two away from the end of his tour. With 9 victories to his credit, he was the leading ace in Korea. But now, over North Korea and 200 miles away from home base at Kimpo, he was sweating out making it home with the 1,100 lbs. of fuel he had left. Minutes earlier, he and his wingman had been attacked by four MiG-15s. In the dogfight that followed Blesse had damaged one MiG, forcing two to break off. Sending his wingman home to safety, he then out maneuvered the remaining two MiGs and headed home himself. Climbing out he caught a glimpse of a MiG-15 crossing left to right in front of him. He looked at his fuel gage and thought, "Hell it's a toss-up anyway. Why not?" and turned into the MiG. Closing to 600”, he fired until the MiG started burning and the pilot ejected. "There went number ten," Blesse thought, but now he was down to 900 lbs. of fuel. Calling "Dumbo," the rescue flying boat that was on station for such emergencies, Blesse made for the coast. His F-86 flamed out at 13,000”, but his glide put him across the North Korean coast at 3,000” and he ejected. "Dumbo" landed alongside his dinghy and flew him back to Kimpo. This limited edition Print has been signed by the late “Boots” Blesse along with the artist, the late Roy Grinnell. Includes a Certificate of Authenticity and measures about 30”w x 24”h.

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Ordering Instructions
1. please specify framed or unframed
2. please specify frame type, color and with or without matting
Major "Boots" Blesse was in a tight spot. This mission on October 3rd, 1952 was his 123rd, two away from the end of his tour. With 9 victories to his credit, he was the leading ace in Korea. But now, over North Korea and 200 miles away from home base at Kimpo, he was sweating out making it home with the 1,100 lbs. of fuel he had left. Minutes earlier, he and his wingman had been attacked by four MiG-15s. In the dogfight that followed Blesse had damaged one MiG, forcing two to break off. Sending his wingman home to safety, he then out maneuvered the remaining two MiGs and headed home himself. Climbing out he caught a glimpse of a MiG-15 crossing left to right in front of him. He looked at his fuel gage and thought, "Hell it's a toss-up anyway. Why not?" and turned into the MiG. Closing to 600”, he fired until the MiG started burning and the pilot ejected. "There went number ten," Blesse thought, but now he was down to 900 lbs. of fuel. Calling "Dumbo," the rescue flying boat that was on station for such emergencies, Blesse made for the coast. His F-86 flamed out at 13,000”, but his glide put him across the North Korean coast at 3,000” and he ejected. "Dumbo" landed alongside his dinghy and flew him back to Kimpo. This limited edition Print has been signed by the late “Boots” Blesse along with the artist, the late Roy Grinnell. Includes a Certificate of Authenticity and measures about 30”w x 24”h.

Show Frame Colors

More Information on our Custom Framing


Ordering Instructions
1. please specify framed or unframed
2. please specify frame type, color and with or without matting

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